Wednesday, March 24, 2010

The Chop House Restaurant was where my big Sis and I celebrated her upcoming birthday. Under a different name it was part of the 150 acre campus of the once very well known school, Castle Heights Military Academy.
This is another one of the old buildings of the school converted to other uses.


This building was converted to a Library.


The main building was converted to Lebanon City Hall. The monument out front honors the cadets.



A closer look at the monument.




The back of the monument. OOPs. I see kitty and the bottom of Sis.





Further up the hill is another monument dedicated to 911.


This building is fenced off and boarded up awaiting someone to come and fix it up to provide a continuing use of the old building. Surely there is someone out there who could use this old building.


This building is now the Corporate Headquarters of Cracker Barrel. If you have never eaten at a Cracker Barrel restaurant you have really missed out on a good meal.
Castle Heights was founded in 1902 in Lebanon, Tennessee as a private school. When World War I approached, it was converted to a military academy and no girls were allowed. Historical documents show that in the 1950's there were over 500 students (all male) enrolled and that the campus had a total acreage of 150 acre. In the Chop House are lots of old photos of the school and the cadets and the instructor. You could spend several hours just going around and looking at the photos.
My big Sis said she could remember how all the young men from tiny ones to large ones ran amok in the city of Lebanon. They all were neatly dressed in their gray uniforms no matter what size.
I remember we had one local Smith County boy who went there and he was always seaking into our high schools functions. The boys in the CHMA were called Goobers. Sorry, I do not know how or when that got started.
In 1970's the girls were allowed to come to the school. The high cost of a boarding school along with the distaste and longevity of the Vietnam War saw the school close in 1986.
The kitty justice is that the school buildings were not torn down but were preserved .







9 comments:

Jerri said...

It would have been a shame if those building were destroyed. They don't build them like that anymore. Thanks for the tour....

Jerri

DUTA said...

The buildings and the monuments are very impressive. (I saw among the names of those who made the "supreme sacrifice", the name Phelps which reminded me of the american olympic swimmer ,winner of golden medals). Your pictures are very good.

Happy Birthday to your sister!

Lady Di Tn said...

Jerri
Glad you enjoyed the tour and I think it was great that the buildings were used. Peace

Duta
Thanks and I wish I had taken a few photos of the cadets in the photos at the Chop House to share. Peace

Changes in the wind said...

Great pictures and I especially loved the 911 monument.

Lady Di Tn said...

Thanks Monica Peace

Abraham said...

I suppose Cracker Barrel is well known everywhere. We like to eat there but the food is very rich.

Old buildings like these are worth a lot to the right kind of people. If who owns them would donate them to deserving organizations I am sure they would please a lot of people

The painting you asked about...

The painting has belonged to the Kettering Museum and Historical Society for about 30 years. (Charles Kettering who founded the National Cash Register Company in Dayton, Ohio)

Lee said...

What wonderful, majestic old buildings they are. And a wonderful building for a restaurant.

Small City Scenes said...

So glad the building were preserved.

I noticed the last dedecation on the memorial is 1997. Interesting.

MB

Lady Di Tn said...

Abe
I hope that one building finds someone to take care of it. Thanks for letting me know about the residence of that beautiful painting. I think it is wonderful that it is in a Museum where others can appreciate your talent. Peace

Lee
I think they have character and I cannot wait to go back and take a few pictures of the photos on the walls. Peace

MB
I agree. Peace